Why do landlords not want people who are claiming housing benefit?

I am separating from my wife and as I am medically retired will need help with my rent which will be paid by housing benefit is this classed as DSS? I see lot's of landlords who will not take DSS, why if the rent is guaranteed to be paid what is the problem?

Asked on Dec 16 2012, General in Huddersfield | Report content

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  • A lot of landlords see DSS tenants as no good scroungers which is not true hence they say no to DSS & the Housing Benefit isn't always paid direct to the landlord and doesn't have to be paid direct and any shortfall in rent has to be paid by the tenant i.e. say the rent was £500 a month and the housing benefit award was just £323 a month then the shortfall has to be paid by the tenant (there is also council tax to pay as well) so if the tenant is on benefits how are they going to pay the shortfall in rent? People's circumstances are different and although it does not seem fair for a landlord to say no to DSS/Housing Benefit it is understandable with the cuts in Housing Benefit but you could always just explain your individual circumstances to a landlord and let him/her see you are not just a no good scrounger and can pay any shortfall in rent and council tax.

    Answered on Dec 17 2012, Report content
  • Sorry to hear this. Sometimes it is just prejudice but often it can be because insurers create problems or because if it later turned out you were not entitled to claim (moonlighting for example) the council can reclaim rent from the landlord. I suggest you get all your references together, medical info etc and approach agents/landlords showing them that there is a genuine reason for your difficulty. Let's face it - nearly everybody could be in your position within a month or two if they had ill health or job problems. Good luck.

    Answered on Dec 17 2012, Report content
  • There are some landlords that are more than happy to take DSS tenants with a full paying guarantor. Reeds Rains for example insist one is in place for any tenants claiming housing benefits. By doing this the landlord is protected from over payments or incorrect payments being clawed back from them. Seems a bit unfair on tenants claiming genuinely but letting agents have to protect landlords. Hope this helps

    Answered on Jan 25 2013, Report content

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