West London's Kensington Palace Gardens is still the most expensive street in Britain, despite nearly £3m being wiped off average property prices since last year.

Kensington Palace Gardens has been coined Britain’s most expensive street for the 11th year running with the average home there costing a staggering £32.9m.

But properties at the prestigious address – home to the likes of Formula One heiress Tamara Ecclestone and Chelsea Football Club owner Roman Abramovich – have still seen £2.8m wiped off their value during the past 12 months, according to our 2019 Rich List.

London's most expensive streets

Exclusive London enclaves accounted for all of the top 10 most expensive places to buy a home, with Courtenay Avenue in N6 taking second place with average house prices of £19.5m, followed by Grosvenor Crescent in SW1X at £19.1m.

Ilchester Place in W14 and The Boltons in SW10 completed the top five with average property values of £15.1m and £14.3m respectively.

Laura Howard, consumer expert at Zoopla, said: “It’s no surprise that it’s the capital that plays host to the UK’s most expensive streets  but, even to the super-rich, the wealth that can be found among them is mind-blowing.

“Outside of London, it’s exclusive pockets of the well-heeled home counties, such as Kent, Surrey and Hertfordshire that boast the priciest streets.”

 

 

Most expensive streets outside of London

The most expensive street outside of London is Montrose Gardens in Leatherhead, Surrey, where property values average £6.5m.

Temple Gardens in Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire, takes second place with a typical home costing £4.4m followed by Philippines Shaw in Sevenoaks, Kent, where you'd need a £3.9m budget to buy a home.

While addresses in southern England dominated the list, Broadway in Altrincham, Greater Manchester, was the fifth most expensive street outside of the capital, with properties valued at an average of just under £3m.

Streets in Alderley Edge in Cheshire, Solihull in the West Midlands and Leicester also made it into the top 10 most expensive streets outside of London.

A seven-bedroom home on London's Courtenay Avenue for £14.5m, around £5m less than the street-average 

Which places have the most £1m-plus streets?

There are now 15,484 streets in Britain where the average property value is more than £1m, although the figure is down from 17,289 in 2018.

Outside of London, Reading has the highest number of streets where the average home is worth at least seven figures at 207, with Guildford taking second place with 200 streets.

The top five was completed by Sevenoaks at 196, Leatherhead at 190 and Richmond at 157.

Overall, 91% of streets with property prices of more than £1m were in southern England.

Property wealth by region

Unsurprisingly, South East England has the most streets on which homes are valued for at least £1m, at 5,671. However, this is 820 fewer than in 2018.

Greater London was not far behind at 5,329, a drop of 514 compared with a year earlier, with the East of England the only other region to see the number of streets with million pound homes run into the thousands at 2,406.

At the other end of the scale, there are only 31 streets in Wales where the average proeprty is valued at £1m or more and just 73 in the North East of England.

All regions of Great Britain saw a decline in the number of streets that fell into this category in the past year, except for Yorkshire and the Humber, where the number rose by four to stand at 165. 

Top 3 takeaways

  • Kensington Palace Gardens has been named as Britain’s most expensive street for the 11th year running with the average home costing a massive £32.9m
  • Exclusive London enclaves accounted for all of the top 10 most expensive places to buy a home
  • The most expensive street outside of London is Montrose Gardens in Leatherhead, Surrey, where property values average £6.5m 

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