Skip to main content

Hamwic Independent Estate Agents, SO40

Call +44 23 8234 9942 | Email agent

Today, Southampton is a modern port city of a quarter of a million inhabitants. Before the mid-9th century however, Southampton did not exist.

After the Roman period in England, a separate settlement moved to the Western side of the River Itchen. This town was called Hamtun. Due to its favourable positioning on the confluence of rivers, proximity to the coast and Roman roads, Hamtun was known as a trading town or a ‘wic’. This led to the town also being referred to as Hamwic. Though both names can be used interchangeably, the name Hamwic is usually used when referring to the trading and economic activities of the town. The streets and plots were aligned by a main north-south running street which today is known as St Mary’s Street. At the south end of this arterial road another main road was found to intersect in an east-west direction which follows modern Chapel Road. Adding to the evidence of Hamwic as an important centre of trade is the presence of a mint. The Royal mint of Hamwic was used by the kings of Wessex between 786- 858AD.

Though there is written evidence of Hamwic being a royal vill since the 8th century, the discovery of a richly furnished burial dating to the 7th century could indicate that there were royalty or at least a wealthy elite around the town. The burials were found under the Southampton Football Club’s new stadium in the north eastern edge of the medieval wic and include richly decorated weaponry and fine gold jewellery. An unknown fact is that they left a lot of these archaeological finds underneath the pitch. 

“It is an intriguing thought to imagine Southampton’s Premiership League footballers are playing over all this surviving Anglo-Saxon archaeology”

Our Logo is taken from the Tudor Rose, which carries a long standing recognisable local identity that is placed upon the City of Southampton crest and Southampton Football Club’s badge, as well as many local council crests, which adds to our own local and personal connections with this City.

Today, Southampton is a modern port city of a quarter of a million inhabitants. Before the mid-9th century however, Southampton did not exist.

After the Roman period in England, a separate settlement moved to the Western side of the River Itchen. This town was called Hamtun. Due to its favourable positioning on the confluence of rivers, proximity to the coast and Roman roads, Hamtun was known as a trading town or a ‘wic’. This led to the town also being referred to as Hamwic. Though both names can be used interchangeably, the name Hamwic is usually used when referring to the trading and economic activities of the town. The streets and plots were aligned by a main north-south running street which today is known as St Mary’s Street. At the south end of this arterial road another main road was found to intersect in an east-west direction which follows modern Chapel Road. Adding to the evidence of Hamwic as an important centre of trade is the presence of a mint. The Royal mint of Hamwic was used by the kings of Wessex between 786- 858AD.

Though there is written evidence of Hamwic being a royal vill since the 8th century, the discovery of a richly furnished burial dating to the 7th century could indicate that there were royalty or at least a wealthy elite around the town. The burials were found under the Southampton Football Club’s new stadium in the north eastern edge of the medieval wic and include richly decorated weaponry and fine gold jewellery. An unknown fact is that they left a lot of these archaeological finds underneath the pitch. 

“It is an intriguing thought to imagine Southampton’s Premiership League footballers are playing over all this surviving Anglo-Saxon archaeology”

Our Logo is taken from the Tudor Rose, which carries a long standing recognisable local identity that is placed upon the City of Southampton crest and Southampton Football Club’s badge, as well as many local council crests, which adds to our own local and personal connections with this City.

Properties Number of properties Avg. asking price Avg. listing age
Residential for sale 151 £310,840 20 weeks

Property for sale by price band

Latest residential property for sale

See all property for sale from this agent